PLV Inscriptions (Carrawburgh to Housesteads)

Introduction

This section of Hadrians’s Wall sees the transition to the crags along the Whin Sill. As might be expected, the inscriptions here are dominated by centurial building stones.

Inventory

1564

RIB 1564

RIB 1564: c(enturia) Avidi (the century of Avidius (built this)). Centurial stone found before 1873 just west of Carrawburgh. Source: RIB I p.498

1565

RIB 1565

RIB 1565: c(enturia) Avidi (century of Avidius (built this)). Centurial stone found before 1873 between Carrawburgh and Housesteads. Source: RIB I p.498

1566

RIB 1566

RIB 1566: vexil(l)atio / legion[is… (a detachment of the … Legion…). Building stone found at Carraw before 1867. Source: RIB I pp.498-9

1567

RIB 1567

RIB 1567: c(enturia) Avid(i) Rufi (the century of Avidius Rufus (built this)). Centurial stone found at Carraw before 1867. Source: RIB I p.499

RIB 1568: coh(ortis) I / [c(enturia)] Terenti / Cantabr[i] (First Cohort, the century of Terentius Cantaber (built this)). Centurial stone found 1892 near Grindon school-house. Source: RIB I p.499

1569

RIB 1569

RIB 1569: leg(io) II / Augusta (Second Legion Augusta (built this)). Building stone found before 1812 at Sewingshields farm. Source: RIB I p.499

1570

RIB 1570

RIB 1570: coh(ortis) V / c(enturia) Caecili / Procli (Fifth Cohort, century of Caecilius Proclus (built this)). Centurial stone found before 1812 at Sewingshields farm. Source: RIB I p.500

1571

RIB 1571

RIB 1571: coh(ortis) V pr(incipis) / c(enturia) Max(imi) (Fifth Cohort, century of the princeps prior Maximus (built this)). Centurial stone found before 1812 at Sewingshields farm. Source: RIB I p.500

1572

RIB 1572

RIB 1572: c(enturia) Gelli / Philipp[i] (the century of Gellius Philippus (built this)). Centurial stone found at Sewingshields Farm gig-house before 1867. Source: RIB I p.500

RIB 1573: Nar (?). Building stone found 1892 on Military Road near Grindon school-house. Source: RIB I p.500

RIB 1574: leg(io) / II / Aug(usta) (Second Legion Augusta (built this)). Building stone found 1832 in Milecastle 36. Now lost. Source: RIB I pp.500-1

1575

RIB 1575

RIB 1575: c(enturia) Floriani / p(edes) XXII (century of Florianus (built) 22 feet). Centurial stone found before 1867 at Moss Kennels Farm. Source: RIB I p.501

RIB 3319: …] / v(otum) s(oluit) l(ibens) m(erito) (…willingly and deservedly fulfilled a vow). Altar base found in 1810 in a field wall between Turrets 33a and 33b. Now lost. Source: RIB III p.312

RIB 3320: leg)(io) VI / Victrix / Pia Fid(elis) (Sixth Legion Victrix Pia Fidelis (built this)). Building stone found 1973 at Turret 33b. Source: RIB III pp.312-13

RIB 3321: c(enturia) CRAI (century of ? (built this)). Centurial stone found 1970 in N face of wall at Turret 33b. Source: RIB III p.313

RIB 3322: + (?). Building stone found 1989 in N face of wall 19m E of Milecastle 35. Source: RIB III p.314

RIB 3323: c(ohortis) X (centuria) Mu(nati) / Maximi (Tenth Cohort century of Munatius). Centurial stone found 1958 187.5m E of Turret 35a. Source: RIB III p.314

RIB 3324: Canio [Vi]/ndicatus (Canio … Vindicatus). Slab found in wall core in 1958 18.2m E of Turret 35a. Source: RIB III p.315

RIB 3331: c(enturia) Saturninus / c(enturia) Lusitani / Hrindenus / optio (Saturninus, centurion. The century of Lusitanus, Hrindenus, optio). Quarry inscription found in 1960 on Queen’s Crags. Source: RIB III p.320

Analysis

The building stones along this stretch record work by the First, Fifth, and Tenth cohorts of a legion, almost certainly legio II Augusta, which is named on the lost building stone from Milecastle 36 (and possibly confirmed by the stone from Sewingshields Farm, possibly from Milecastle 35). The stone recording work by legio VI VIctrix found at Turret 33b probably relates to restoration work there after the return from the Antonine Wall in the later 2nd century.

The Per Lineam Valli atlas of Hadrian’s Wall

Back in 2007, I used Google Earth to plot the course of Hadrian’s Wall. To this I added some basic information, in the form of links to online resources like English Heritage’s (now Historic England’s) Pastscape, the National Monuments Record’s online database, references to documents on the Hadrian’s Wall Research Framework website, images of sites, and, information from Roman-Britain.org. You can still see the remnants of that early version on the Wayback Machine.

Now I have embarked upon an ambitious upgrade to the website. Online digital mapping has come a long way since my original efforts and I want to bring all the benefits of the latest techniques to the mapping of the Roman Wall – whether in the comfort of your own home or on your mobile phone on a wind-blasted hillside in Northumberland!

That, however, is not all that I’m up. Find out more in my next post on Patreon.

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The Roman Army A to Z: vinea

vinea (f. pl. vineae)

Literally a ‘vine arbour’, a wooden shed that formed part of a modular system for constructing covered walkways used by besiegers attacking a fortification. According to Vegetius, each was 8Rft (2.4m) wide, 16Rft (4.8m) long, and 7Rft (2.1m) high, with a roof covered in planking and sides in wattlework, an untanned leather or patchwork outer layer rendering the whole fireproof. Plaut., Mil. 2.2.113; Caes., BG 2.12.3; Veg., DRM 4.15. [Campbell 2003]