Wall Mile 63

Wall Mile 63 [HB 338]

Much of what follows involves trudging along the verges of fairly busy roads, so we must ensure that we take all due care. West of Walby, the Wall continues as a hedgeline running towards the the A689 to the west. This road is about to leave the Military Road and strike northwards.

The line of the curtain wall W of Walby

The line of the curtain wall W of Walby

Although the course of the Vallum is marked as extant at this point on the English Heritage map, it is not apparent on the ground as an earthwork, so don’t bother looking for it.

The ditch in Brunstock Park

The ditch in Brunstock Park

Continuing alongside the A689 we soon come to a roundabout, where the A689 makes its bid for freedom. The Military Road carries straight on as the B6264, and we can now decide whether we want to make a detour to see the Wall ditch. We can see it by following the A689 northwards where the ditch appears to our left opposite the entrance to a small lane on the right. It crosses Brunstock Park as a conveniently delineated enclosed area of rough ground amidst the arable fields. An alternative strategy (always useful to have one – stumbling along busy road verges is not always a desirable mode of perambulation) is to head down the B6264 and take the unclassified lane on the right towards Brunstock and the ditch can be glimpsed to the right just before reaching the first bend.

If either detour option is taken, we will need to head back to the B6264, so that we can carry on westwards (there is no pavement for most of the way so the verge has to be utilised). Just before we reach the site of Milecastle 64, the wall is breached by the cutting of the M6 (in 1970, when it was constructed, no preliminary archaeological work was undertaken, as was so often the way back then). The actual milecastle is off to our right and is inaccessible.

Milecastle 64 (Drawdykes) [HB 338; haiku]

Although MacLauchlan failed to find it, the site of Milecastle 64 now sits perched on the western edge of the motorway embankment, within a former army camp. It was excavated by a serving army officer in 1962 and found to be a short-axis example. Part of an inscribed milestone was also found. There is nothing to see now.

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